Slum Golf' on Amazon miniTV questions why the less privileged are often denied the right to dream of reaching certain heights. It confronts the stark reality that sports like golf, traditionally reserved for the affluent, rarely pique the interest of those with lesser means.

Slum Golf Review: A Hole-in-One Against Elitism

Crashing through the barriers of elitism, ‘Slum Golf’ on Amazon miniTV isn’t just a series—it’s a rallying cry for justice through the lens of cinema.

Art, as a powerful force, should dismantle the walls of privilege, and this series takes a swing at that notion.

In a world where labels seem unavoidable, from sports to education, ‘Slum Golf’ questions why the less privileged are often denied the right to dream of reaching certain heights. It confronts the stark reality that sports like golf, traditionally reserved for the affluent, rarely pique the interest of those with lesser means.

I’m reminded of a survey I conducted during my dissertation, where a teenager highlighted, “Fashion designing only works for the rich; here, it gets stuck at becoming a ‘tailor’ only.” That eye-opening moment led me to reflect on the systemic barriers that limit aspirations.

And coming forth, Slum Golf gets me again!

This series, directed by Sujay Sunil Dahake, depicts the struggles of individuals from the slums striving for their dreams while juggling life’s challenges. The narrative centers on Pawan Nagre, brilliantly portrayed by Mayur More (of ‘Kota Factory’ fame), a boy from Bharat Nagar’s slums with dreams of becoming a professional golfer.

Mayur More, known for his role in ‘Kota Factory,’ nails it as Pawan Nagre, a slum-dweller from Bharat Nagar with dreams as big as the fairway. As he navigates the world of pro-golf shops, we’re introduced to Sharad Kelkar’s character, Gautam Rane, a coach with a past marred by gambling. Rane’s return to the Royal Golf Club adds complexity to the narrative, making it a rollercoaster of emotions.

But this isn’t just a tale of underprivileged dreams; it’s a critique of societal classes. The series skillfully unsnarls the gambling pitfalls of the middle class and the family drama of the upper class. It’s a social hullabaloo woven with the threads of financial struggles, daily challenges, and the unbreakable bonds of unity among the characters.

Financial constraints force many to sacrifice their aspirations. Pawan, for instance, supports his family financially, but their world crumbles when their makeshift home collapses.

‘Slum Golf’ is more than a watch; it reflects our societal structures, a personal journey that resonates with my survey experiences. It boldly asserts that dreams know no social boundaries and that, through cinema, we can challenge the status quo. So, if you’re ready for a hole-in-one against elitism, ‘Slum Golf’ is the swing you’ve been waiting for.

IWMBuzz rates it 4 stars out of 5.